CLERICAL VESTURE
OF THE
PATRIARCHATE OF SAINT STEPHEN


This page provides information on some of the basic habits worn
by prelates and clerics within the jurisdiction of the Stephenian Patriarchate.

All images excerpted from the complete set of graphics contained
in the Cæremoniale Aulae S. Mariae Walsinghamensis.
Entire contents © Copyright.



Cappa magna of a bishop or archbishop
shown with winter hood.

Cappa Magna

The cappa magna is the most full form of choir dress of bishops and the Archdeacon and Deans ad honorem of the Patriarchal
Chapter. The cappa is worn over the choir cassock and rochet and has a train. Jurisdictional bishops may wear the train down
and extended within their own jurisdictions. For wear by other prelates and for general use, the train is worn folded up or carried
over the left arm. During the summer half-year, the hood is of silk or cloth. During the winter half-year, the hood is of fur. The
pectoral cross is generally worn over the hood.


The mozzetta of a bishop or archbishop.

Mozzetta

The mozzetta is worn by jurisdictional bishops within their own jurisdiction. It is worn over the choir cassock and rochet. The
pectoral cross is worn on a green and gold cord. This habit is the most common general-use choral habit of a jurisdictional
bishop and constitutes his primary habit.

The mozzetta of a bishop or archbishop outside
their territory or of an auxiliary bishop.

Mantelletta

The mantelletta is worn over the rochet and choir cassock by auxiliary bishops everywhere, and by jurisdictional bishops
when outside their territory. It is also worn by the Archdeacon, Deans ad Honorem, and Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter.
Bishops use the pectoral cross on a green and gold cord. The Archdeacon and Deans ad honorem wear the pectoral cross
on a purple and gold cord. Canons do not use the pectoral cross.

The mozzetta worn with the mantelletta underneath.

Mozzetta with Mantelletta

The mantelletta is worn underneath the mozzetta by jurisdictional bishops within their own territory in the presence of a greater
prelate within their specific hierarchy, e.g., a Bishop Ordinary being visited by his Metropolitan. This combination is also used
always by the Archbishop Coadjutor of the Patriarchal See and, in scarlet, by the Governor-General.

The cotta worn over the rochet. The lack
of pectoral cross indicates a Canon
of the Patriarchal Chapter.

Cotta or Surplice

The cotta or surplice is worn over the rochet by minor prelates when administering a sacrament requiring a stole. Bishops may
do likewise, or they may place the stole directly over the rochet. Clerics who are not prelates wear the cotta or surplice
over the black clerical cassock.

The mantellum of a Chamberlain.

Mantellum

The mantellum is worn directly over the purple choral cassock of a Patriarchal Chamberlain. It is also used by the Master of
the Household and the Train Bearer, both over a purple cassock with black buttons, trimmings, and cuffs.

The penitential choral habit of
a bishop or archbishop within
his own jurisdiction.

Penitential Habit

The choral habits of prelates each have a penitential form, worn when the litrugical color is purple, rose, or black. The
penitential versions are just as their regular versions, except that the choral cassock is black with optional purple
buttons, trimmings, and cuffs.

The formal house habit of the Archdeacon
or Deans ad honorem of the Patriarchal Chapter,
with purple ferraiolo worn off the shoulders.

Formal House Dress with Ferraiolo

The formal house dress of prelates consists of the black house cassock, usually with red buttons and trimming, and a ferraiolo. For
Bishops, the ferraiolo is purple silk, worn over the shoulders. For the Archdeacon and Deans ad honorem of the Patriarchal
Chapter, the ferraiolo is purple wool and worn off the shoulders. Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter wear black ferraiolo with
purple ties, also off the shoulder. Clerics who are not prelates use a black ferraiolo, off the shoulders, with black ties over the
black clerical cassock with black fascia.


Informal abito corto of a cleric.

Abito Corto/Civic Habit

The Patriarchate does not make use of the modern "clergy suit," but instead follows a more ancient custom. When not
vested in the clerical cassock, clerics wear either abito corto (a shortened version of the cassock worn with trousers
and a vest) or a regular suit with zucchetto and, for bishops, the pectoral cross and ring. Formal abito corto is worn with
knee britches and stockings. A ferraiolo is worn as appropriate. The jackets and vests of prelates are trimmed in a similar
fashion to the house cassock. Abito corto may be worn in most situations in which the house cassock may be used.

 

Habits of the Patriarch and Governor-General

The habits of the Patriarch and Governor-General are essentially identical to those of bishops, except that what is purple is red. A purple cassock with red trimming
and a stole of plain cloth over the red mozzetta (usually purple; rose on rose days) are used in penitential seasons and for mourning.


See also:

Frequently Asked Questions

About the Patriarchate

 

The Old Holy Roman Church of the English Rite is an autonomous and semi-autocephalous Old Roman Catholic
Patriarchate with Anglican patrimony descended from the Roman Catholic See of Utrecht.
The See of Utrecht was granted autonomy from Rome by the Holy See in 1145 and has remained independent.
Modernly known as the Anglican Rite Roman Catholic Church (ARRCC), the Patriarchate is faithful
to the magisterium of eternal Rome and the eternal One, Holy, Catholic, Apostolic, and Roman Church.
While it embraces the current Roman Communion (commonly referred to as the Roman Catholic Church,
the Anglican Ordinariate, the Anglican Communion, and other Catholic and Anglican bodies as brethren,
they are not administratively bound with the ARRCC.

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