Forms of Address for Laity and Lay Officials

In accordance with the Caeremoniale Aulae S. Mariae Walsinghamensis.

Note: For Forms of Address for Clerics, please click here.


This page gives general forms of address as used within the Patriarchate of St. Stephen
and does not attempt to cover all possible scenarios.

 

Gentlemen

Mr. followed by full name or surname.

Dr. or other title is used when held in place of Mr.

 

Married Ladies

Mrs. followed by their husband's full name or surname.

Dr. or another title, if held, is instead used with her full name or surname, not her husband's name.

 

Joint Style for a Married Couple

Mr. and Mrs. + surname or Mr. and Mrs. + husband's name

Dr. or another title, if held, is used in place of Mr. If the spouse has a doctorate and wishes to use it socially in the joint style, then the form is Dr. + husband's first name + "and Dr." + wife's name, followed by the surname. In the event that the wife has a doctorate or another title and wishes to use it socially, then the form is Mr. (or proper title of the husband) + husband's first name + "and" + Dr. (or wife's proper title) + wife's name, followed by the surname.

 

Unmarried Ladies

Miss, followed by their full name or surname

Dr. or other title may be used when held in place of Miss.

 

Minors

Girls use Miss and their full name or surname.

Boys use Master until they reach the age of maturity.

 

Wives of Clerics

Dame followed by their full name or first name.

Note that Dame is the female equivalent of Dom and therefore refers to the Latin "Domina," meaning "Lady."

 

Untitled Nobles

Dom/Dame + First Name or Full Name

Note that nobles use the style of Dom (short for the Latin Dominus, meaning "Lord") like clerics, but without "Reverend."

 

Nobles from the Rank of Baron through Noble Prince

Formal: His/Her Excellency (abbreviated "H.E.") Dom/Dame First Name, followed by surname and/or title name.

Informal: Dom/Dame + First Name or Title + First Name or Title + title name

E.g., Count N. or the Count of NN.

Children of Nobles use the same style as their parents, e.g., the children of a Baron are also styled Baron/Baroness. See the Ceremonial and Acta Patriarchalis Sedis for full details on inheritance of titles that fall under the suzerainty of the Patriarchate.

The form of the joint style is "Their Excellencies" (abbreviated T.E.) + Title (male form) + husband's name + "and" + Title (female form) + wife's name + surname and/or title name. Dom and Dame may be placed after the title and before the Christian names. E.g., T.E. Count Dom N. and Countess Dame N. of NN. And alternative form is T.E. Dom N. and Dame N., Count and Countess of NN. The names also may be omitted, leaving only the title name, e.g., T.E. the Count and Countess of NN.

 

Serene and Royal Princes

Formal: His/Her Royal/Serene Highness Dom/Madame First Name, followed by surname and/or title name

Prince may alternatively be placed before or in place of "Dom," and Princess may be alternatively placed after or in place of Madame, e.g., H.R.H. Madame the Princess N. of NN.

Informal: Dom/Madame + First Name or Prince/Princess + First Name

Children of Princes use the same style as their parents, e.g., the children of a Prince are also styled Prince/Princess. See the Ceremonial and Acta Patriarchalis Sedis for full details on inheritance of titles that fall under the suzerainty of the Patriarchate.

The form of the joint style is "Their Royal/Serene Highnesses" (abbreviated T.R.H.) + Prince + husband's name + "and" + Princess + wife's name + surname and/or title name. Dom may be placed after Prince and before the Christian name, and Madame may be placed before Princess. E.g., T.R.H. the Prince Dom N. and Madame the Princess Dame N. of NN. And alternative form is T.R.H. Dom N. and Madame N., Prince and Princess of NN. The names also may be omitted, leaving only the title name, e.g., T.R.H. the Prince and Princess of NN.

Royal Highness is used for those titles affiliated with a territory of kingdom rank or for a Grand Duke and his heir. Imperial Highness is used for those titles affiliated with a territory of an empire. Serene Highness is the title generally used otherwise. However, there are exceptions. Grand Ducal Highness is the standard style for younger children of a Grand Duke. Some houses also simply use Highness as a matter of historical usage. Also, there are combined styles, such as Royal and Serene Highness, Royal and Imperial Highness, and Most Eminent Royal Highness. Other variations exist. For titles relating to the patrimony of the Patriarchate of St. Stephen, only the styles of Royal Highness, Serene Highness, Grand Ducal Highness, and Most Eminent Royal Highness are currently used.

 

 

[Document Archive]

[Main Page]

 

 

 

Entire Contents Copyright © 2011. Anglican Rite Roman Catholic Church.
All Rights Reserved. The Anglican Rite Catholic Church is a trademark.